Tingling Feet Or Hands… Is It Peripheral Neuropathy?

Tingling Feet Or Hands… Is It Peripheral Neuropathy?

You may have peripheral neuropathy if you are experiencing uncomfortable sensations in parts of your body.

If you have tingling in your feet or hands, burning sensations in your back or face, or muscle weakness or lack of coordination – it’s time to learn more.

If you are wondering what it is and how can you get rid of it, the first thing you need to do is visit a medical professional. This will allow for you to get an accurate diagnosis based on a thorough examination of your symptoms, including lab work and diagnostics. Your doctor may discover you have peripheral neuropathy.

What Is Peripheral Neuropathy?

When you hear the word shingles, or carpal tunnel syndrome, you may automatically grimace because you know (or know someone) who has experienced this pain. These are great examples of peripheral neuropathy.

Every person has a central nervous system and a peripheral nervous system.

The peripheral nervous system includes the brain and spinal cord, which are connected to nerves that send messages to the rest of your body like your:

When your nerves are damaged in any way, and the brain and spinal cord are unable to send messages to the rest of your body, this is called peripheral neuropathy.

Negative symptoms may become recognizable in the areas that need to get a message but can’t.

Negative symptoms can include:

Symptoms can be noticed in one or multiple areas of the body.

If this sounds familiar you may be wondering what causes peripheral neuropathy in the first place.

Causes of Peripheral Neuropathy

There can be many different reasons for damage in the peripheral nervous system, thus causing peripheral neuropathy.

Genetics can even play a role in the development of peripheral neuropathy. All of which can lead to varying symptoms.

Symptoms of Peripheral Neuropathy

There is not a common symptom for every person suffering from peripheral neuropathy. Each case is individualized and symptoms vary based on the job the damaged nerve was supposed to be able to do.

If you are having muscle problems, you may receive symptoms of weakness, spasms or pain. This means your muscles are not receiving the messages it needs from your brain or spinal cord.

You may notice you are having difficulty picking up things, or that to touch something creates pain.

Sensory Symptoms

If so, peripheral neuropathy may be related to your sensory nerves. Damage to the sensory nerves may affect your

Other Symptoms

If there is damage to your motor senses, you may find it hard to balance yourself, walk on your own, or control your muscles. Muscle weakness and cramps are other symptoms.

Your automatic nerves send and receive messages related to body temperature, digestion, and blood pressure. So, if any of these are disrupted or painful, peripheral neuropathy may be the reason. Other symptoms can include

Don’t let these symptoms scare you. There is help. Treatment can work.

Getting Treatment

Treatment for peripheral neuropathy is individualized. This i just like the symptoms and causes. The best thing you can do is find a quality pain management center with medical professionals who have extensive knowledge and experience with this disorder.

A good pain management center will not just prescribe medication. Their goal is to reverse the problems in the area causing the nerve problems.

To do so, they will treat the whole body to ensure the connection between your mind and body is given the attention it needs to help you overcome peripheral neuropathy.

Working with your doctor, you will discover the root cause of your pain. From this point, you develop a treatment plan. Your treatment may include several different treatments.

There is rarely just one treatment procedure to deal with peripheral neuropathy.

Treatment Possibilities

Because pain can have an effect on both your mental and physical health, it is important you work with a doctor who prescribes techniques for improving both.

Options your doctor may pursue include anti-depressants, over the counter anti-inflammatory medicine, or prescription medication.

Other options include surgery and nerve stimulation or modulation therapies. Furthermore, your doctor should focus on your lifestyle and areas that may need improvement, such as diet and exercise. He or she will evaluate your nutrient levels and if you are lacking, may prescribe vitamins and minerals.

Therapies

Complementary treatment therapies may also include:

There may even be a time where surgery is the answer. That is a decision for you and your doctor to make.

There are some up and coming alternative therapies to rid your body of toxins that can cause neuropathy.

One such treatment is Chelation Therapy, where you are giving a binding agent that connects to the toxins in your body so they can exit your body through your urine.

For immune disorders, Intravenous Immunoglobulin Therapy works to try and stop the immune process that is creating the damage in the first place.

Physical therapy is also available at some pain doctors to help treat muscles in pain from nerve damage.

Conclusion

Do not wait to seek treatment. There is a high likelihood your doctor can successfully treat your nerve issues.

Start the process today by reaching out to a pain management specialist. They are ready to help you live a pain free life.

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